Course Submission & Consultation System User's Manual

Introduction

Access ANGEL

Activate the CSCS

Approval Process Overview

Navigate within a Proposal

Submit a Proposal to Add a Course

Submit a Proposal to Change a Course

Submit a Proposal to Drop a Course

Revise a Proposal at the Request of a Reviewer

Respond to a Formal Reviewer of a Course Proposal Who Does Not Concur

Understanding the CSCS Tools

CSCS Rights Tool: Granting CSCS Rights to Non-Faculty Users

Manage My Consultation Groups Tool

View the Review History of a Proposal

Print a Copy of the Proposal

Review a Course Proposal

Appendix A: Special Categories Additional Information

Writing/Speaking (GWS) Courses

Quantification (GQ) Courses

Health and Physical Activity (GHA) Courses

Natural Sciences (GN) Courses

Arts (GA) Courses

Humanities (GH) Courses

Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS) Courses

General Education Core Competencies (GHA, GN, GA, GH, or GS course suffixes)

Writing Across the Curriculum (W, M, X, Y course suffixes)

United States Culture (US) and International Cultures (IL) Courses

Bachelor of Arts Courses

Introduction

Welcome to the Course Submission and Consultation System (CSCS). This system was designed to manage the submission of course proposals as well as facilitate the approval process electronically. If you have submitted a proposal in the past, then much of this manual will be familiar. If you are submitting a course proposal for the first time, this manual will guide you through all of the steps as well as serve as a reference for troubleshooting problems.

The CSCS is a module within Penn State's Course Management System, ANGEL. If you have used ANGEL in the past, you should feel very comfortable with the CSCS user interface. If you are new to ANGEL, you will find using the CSCS and many other ANGEL features very user friendly and intuitive.

Access ANGEL

To access ANGEL:

  1. Go to http://cms.psu.edu/.
  2. Leave Penn State selected in the pull-down menu and click the Log On button.

    Screen capture.
    Click Log On.

  3. If you are not already logged on to a Penn State service using WebAccess, such as the Portal or WebMail, the WebAccess login form will display. Enter your Penn State Access Account user ID (e.g., xyz123) and password.

    Screen capture.
    Enter your user ID and password, then click Login.

  4. Click the Login button. The My Profile page will display.

Activate the CSCS

Note: By default, only faculty members have the right to access the CSCS. A faculty member can grant a staff member rights to the CSCS in order to enter course proposal information by following the steps in the CSCS Rights Tool: Granting CSCS Rights to Non-Faculty Users section of this document below. Staff members with faculty rights (staff who are also instructors) can activate the CSCS themselves.

To activate the CSCS from My Profile:

  1. Select the Edit Page link in the toolbar.

    Screen capture.
    Select the Edit Page link.

  2. Click the Add Components button.
  3. In the Available Components pop-up window, select My Course Submission and Consultation.

    Screen capture.
    Select My Course Submission and Consultation.

  4. Click the Add Selected button. The component will appear in the preview area.

    Note: You must be an instructor to activate the CSCS. If you do not see My Course Submission and Consultation listed under the available components, you may contact the office of the Faculty Senate at 814-863-1202 or the requesting faculty member to receive permission to access this service.

  5. Click the Save button in the upper right.

You will be returned to the My Profile page, which will now display a My Course Submission and Consultation System component. (If not, select the Refresh link in the My Profile toolbar.)

Screen capture.
My Course Submission & Consultation System component

Note: If you are a faculty member who is being asked to provide a proposal review for the first time, the system will automatically activate the CSCS on your My Profile page.

You can now begin to enter proposal information and begin the approval process. There are three different types of proposals, add, change, and drop, each of which require a different set of information. Each type of proposal is described below.

Before you begin to enter any information, it is beneficial to understand how the approval process works.

Approval Process Overview

Once the initiator has completed a proposal, he or she begins the approval process by clicking a button that sends the proposal to a designated college proposal administrator/administrative group. Once the college proposal administrator determines the proposal is ready, it enters the approval process.

The approval process consists of a series of reviews. For example, for an undergraduate course proposal, the series of reviews would be linear and in the following order: head of the department/division, SCCA college representative, dean of the college or his/her representative, Faculty Senate. The CSCS uses e-mail notification for all steps of the review process. E-mails are generated for the following events:

  • Request from the initiator/submitter requesting a review from a consultant
  • Notification to the initiator and submitter of the proposal that a reviewer does not concur with the proposal
  • Reminders sent to consultants and signatories each Monday if a review has not been completed (a consultant/signatory with more than one outstanding review will receive a single reminder listing all proposals requiring review).
  • Notification to the initiator and submitter that the essential/formal consultation for the proposal is complete
  • Requests to consultants and the initiator/submitter for review and notification when the status has been changed by an administrator
  • Notification to the initiator and submitter that a college proposal administrator has reset the proposal, indicating it requires major changes before entering the approval process
  • Notification to the initiator and submitter that the Faculty Senate has approved or rejected the proposal

Once a proposal has entered the approval process, the initiator will no longer be able to make any changes. If changes need to be made, you may consult the Faculty Senate office at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to help you.

If a proposal is approved by a reviewer, then an e-mail will be sent to the next reviewer requesting his/her review. The process will continue in this manner until the Faculty Senate is asked to review the proposal. Once the Faculty Senate has reviewed the proposal, the proposal will then be marked as "Accepted," "Declined for Major Reasons," or "Declined for Minor Reasons." If a proposal is declined for major reasons, the proposal will be archived and deleted. If the proposal is declined for minor reasons, the initiator will receive an e-mail stating that certain changes need to be made. Once the changes are made, the initiator will then have the option to send the proposal directly back to the Faculty Senate office for review without restarting the approval process.

If, however, a proposal is not approved by any consultant in the approval process, the initiator of the proposal will be asked to make changes. Once the changes have been made, the approval process starts over with the first available consultant needed for approval. It is imperative to understand that if the reviewer does not approve of a proposal, then the approval process will have to begin again from the beginning.

Navigate within a Proposal

As you are in the process of creating a proposal as described in the next sections, you may use two different means to move through the proposal screens.

The Back and Next buttons at the bottom of each screen allow you to navigate back or forward one screen at a time.

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Back and Next buttons

To jump immediately to a screen, select it from the pull-down menu at the top right, then click the Go button. Note: The pull-down menu will only list screens to which you have already added information.

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Pull-down menu at top right

Submit a Proposal to Add a Course

To submit a proposal to add a course, from My Profile:

  1. Select the Enter My Course Submission and Consultation System link.

    Screen capture.
    Select Enter My Course Submission & Consultation System.

  2. Select the Create New Proposal link in the toolbar.

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    Select Create New Proposal.

  3. If not already filled in, enter the name and Access Account user ID of the principal faculty member proposing the course and select the college/department.

    Note: The default values for these fields correspond with the person who is currently logged on. It is important to mention that this information should always be representative of a faculty member. A staff member may complete the online forms, but he/she must first be given permission to access the CSCS. To grant permission to a non-faculty member see the CSCS Rights Tool: Granting CSCS Rights to Non-Faculty Users section of this document below.

    Note: To look up the user ID of the principal faculty member or the submitter, you can select the Search Penn State Directory link.

  4. The name and e-mail of the submitter correspond with the person who is currently logged on, by default. If incorrect, edit the information as necessary.
  5. Click the Next button.
  6. On the resulting screen, select Add to indicate the type of proposal.

    Screen capture.
    Select Add.

  7. Click the Next button.
  8. For the proposed course, select the college/department and enter the course abbreviation, course number, and course title.
  9. Select the College/Academic Unit with Curriculum Responsibility for the proposed course from the pull-down menu.

    Screen capture.
    Select the College/Academic Unit with Curriculum Responsibility.

    Note: This selection will determine the required signatories that will be listed, dictate what college level consultation groups will be listed, and determine which college proposal administrative group will have management control over the proposal.

  10. Click the Next button. If the course already exists, a message will notify you of this. If no such course exists, the next portion of the form will display.
  11. Enter the name and Access Account user ID and select the college/department of each faculty consultant the proposal requires. (If none, the approval process will begin with a review by the head of the department/campus academic officer.)
  12. Click the Next button.
  13. Enter the name and Access Account user ID of all other necessary consultants/reviewers.

    Note: The number of consultants may differ according to the course level, e.g., undergraduate or graduate. However, there will at least be information sections for the head of the department/campus academic officer, the college representative, and the dean of the college. This information may already be filled in. If it is incorrect or missing, you may modify these fields to reflect the correct information.

  14. Click the Next button.
  15. Check the box next to any special category that applies to an undergraduate course. If you do so, additional information will be required, detailed in Appendix A below.

    Screen capture.
    Check the box to any applicable special category.

  16. Scroll down and complete the fields detailing the new proposed course.

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    Complete the fields detailing the proposed course.

    The following information is required on this page.

    • Undergraduate Special Categories (if applicable)
    • Abbreviated Title
    • Minimum and Maximum Credits
    • Repeatable (yes or no)
    • Total Maximum Credits (required only if "yes" is selected for the Repeatable setting)
    • Short Description
    • Prerequisites
    • Concurrent Courses
    • Cross Listings (see following note)
    • Credit Only (yes or no): this field is only available for courses that are 900 level and above
    • Anonymous Grade (yes or no): this field is only available for courses that are 900 level and above
    • Outline of Course Content
    • Listing of Major Topics to be Covered and Time Allotted for their discussion
    • Brief Description of the Course (up to 400 words)
    • Names of Faculty Members Responsible for the Development of the Course
    • Instructional, Educational, and Course Objectives
    • Evaluation Methods
    • Relationship/Linkage of Course to Other Courses
    • Relationship of Course to Major, Option, Minor, or General Education
    • Description of any Special Facilities
    • Frequency of Offering and Enrollment
    • Effective Date

    This list should help to serve as a list for preparation. If you are at this screen and do not have all the required information, you may click the Complete Proposal Later button at the bottom of the screen and return to this proposal at a later time.

    Note: The Consultation Summary/Response text field can be used after the proposal has been submitted and reviewed in order for the submitter to respond to reviewers' comments.

  17. Once you have completed the required information, click the Next button.

    Note: If for section A, number 9, you selected "I wish to add cross-listings," a screen will display where you must specify how many cross listings to add. Select a number, then click Next.

    Screen capture.
    If applicable, select the number of cross-listings.

    For each cross-listed course, specify the course abbreviation and course number, then click Continue.

    Screen capture.
    Specify the course abbreviation and number of each cross-listed course.

    On the subsequent screen, specify the head of department/campus academic officer/division head for each course. Click Next.

  18. If no special categories were selected, you may now send the proposal out for review. (If you have selected any of the special categories, please reference Appendix A below for a description of the required information.) There are three different types of review:
    • An informal consultation is a means by which a proposal can be reviewed by any number of people without affecting the status of the approval process. It can be used for friendly peer/informal review before or during the approval process. An e-mail will be sent to you (the initiator of the proposal) only if the reviewer does not concur with the proposal. (To learn how to create a group of informal consultants, see the Manage My Consultation Groups Tool section of this document below.) If you have created such a group, check the box for that group, then click the Submit Request For Informal Consultation button.

      Note: By default, the request will be sent to all members of the group; however, you can optionally deselect the check box next to a name so that person will not receive a request.

      Screen capture.
      Requesting an informal consultation

    • Formal Consultation: Consultation groups may have been created for the college pertaining to the proposed course. Those groups from whom coordination is required by the college are grayed out and cannot be unchecked. To initiate a formal consultation, check the box for any additional pertinent consultation group besides those already checked, then click the Submit Request For Formal Consultation button.

      Note: By default, the request will be sent to all members of the group; however, you can optionally deselect the check box next to a name so that person will not receive a request.

      Screen capture.
      Requesting a formal consultation

      Note: If the proposal is for an undergraduate course, each party included in the Essential/Formal Consultation will be given two weeks to respond. A group/individual consultant is assumed to concur if no response is received within that time. No time limit is imposed in the case of a graduate, law, or medical course.

    • The third type of review is the actual approval process. The Send To College Proposal Administrative Group button is only available once all parties included in the Formal Consultation have responded to the proposal. (The faculty submitter and any staff person to whom CSCS rights have been granted to initiate the proposal will receive an e-mail when this has been achieved.) Once you click the Send To College Proposal Administrative Group button, you will not be able to further edit the proposal.

      Screen capture.
      Click Send To College Proposal Administrative Group.

Notes: Once the approval process has started, you will not be able to edit the information in the proposal. The information will be protected until it has been noted that a change is necessary. If you would like to make a change or reset the status of the proposal, you may contact the Faculty Senate at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to help you.

Some e-mail programs may place the automated e-mail into a recipient’s "Junk" folder. If your proposal has not been reviewed by a particular individual you may want to notify him/her yourself that a review is necessary.

Submit a Proposal to Change a Course

To submit a proposal to change a course, from My Profile:

  1. Select the Enter My Course Submission and Consultation System link.

    Screen capture.
    Select Enter My Course Submission & Consultation System.

  2. Select the Create New Proposal link in the toolbar.

    Screen capture.
    Select Create New Proposal.

  3. If not already filled in, enter the name and Access Account user ID of the principal faculty member proposing the course change and select the college/department.

    Note: The default values for these fields correspond with the person who is currently logged on. It is important to mention that this information should always be representative of a faculty member. A staff member may complete the online forms, but he/she must first be given permission to access the CSCS. To grant permission to a non-faculty member see the CSCS Rights Tool: Granting CSCS Rights to Non-Faculty Users section of this document below.

    Note: To look up the user ID of the principal faculty member or the submitter, you can select the Search Penn State Directory link.

  4. The name and e-mail of the submitter correspond with the person who is currently logged on, by default. If incorrect, edit the information as necessary.
  5. Click the Next button.
  6. On the resulting screen, select Change to indicate the type of proposal.

    Screen capture.
    Select Change.

  7. Click the Next button.
  8. Select the Course Abbreviation, then the Course Number & Title of the course you are proposing to change.
  9. Select the college/academic unit with curriculum responsibility for the course.

    Screen capture.
    Select the College/Academic Unit with Curriculum Responsibility.

    Note: This selection will determine the required signatories that will be listed, dictate what college level consultation groups will be listed, and determine which college proposal administrative group will have management control over the proposal.

  10. Click the Next button.
  11. If the course was offered in the past four years, a message will indicate where and when, and any cross-listed courses and their locations will be listed. Once you have reviewed this information, click the Continue button.
  12. Enter the name and Access Account user ID and select the college/department of each faculty consultant the proposal requires. (If none, the approval process will begin with a review by the head of the department/campus academic officer.)
  13. Click the Next button.
  14. Enter the name and Access Account user ID of all other necessary consultants/reviewers.

    Note: The number of consultants may differ according to the course level, e.g., undergraduate or graduate. However, there will at least be information sections for the head of the department/campus academic officer, the college representative, and the dean of the college. This information may already be filled in. If it is incorrect or missing, you may modify these fields to reflect the correct information.

  15. Click the Next button.
  16. Now that you have completed all of the information necessary for the approval process, you are ready to start entering information about the course change that you are proposing.

    If the course is an undergraduate course, a special categories section will display with the current special categories bolded.

    These special categories may require additional information in order to complete the proposal. For example, if you have decided to change a course to a Writing-Intensive Permanent (WF) course, then you will also need to provide information that details how the course will fulfill this category. You may also be asked to provide additional information for many other categories such as the General Education Core Competency, or the Bachelor of Arts Degree requirements. If you have selected any of the special categories, please reference Appendix A below for a description of the required information.

  17. The second section of this page displays the current information listed for the course. Enter the changes you are proposing in the applicable field(s). (You do not need to edit any information that will remain the same.)

    Enter a Justification Statement as to why the course should be changed and the Effective Date for changing the course.

    Note: If you are at this screen and do not have all the required information, you may click the Complete Proposal Later button at the bottom of the screen and return to this proposal at a later time.

    Note: The Consultation Summary/Response text field can be used after the proposal has been submitted and reviewed in order for the submitter to respond to reviewers' comments.

  18. Once you have completed the required information, click the Next button.

    Note: If for section B, number 9, you selected "I wish to add cross-listings," a screen will display where you must specify how many cross listings to add. Select a number, then click Next.

    Screen capture.
    If applicable, select the number of cross-listings.

    For each cross-listed course, specify the course abbreviation and course number, then click Continue.

    Screen capture.
    Specify the course abbreviation and number of each cross-listed course.

    On the subsequent screen, specify the head of department/campus academic officer/division head for each course. Click Next.

  19. If no special categories were selected, you may now send the proposal out for review. (If you have selected any of the special categories, please reference Appendix A below for a description of the required information.) There are three different types of review:
    • An informal consultation is a means by which a proposal can be reviewed by any number of people without affecting the status of the approval process. It can be used for friendly peer/informal review before or during the approval process. An e-mail will be sent to you (the initiator of the proposal) only if the reviewer does not concur with the proposal. (To learn how to create a group of informal consultants, see the Manage My Consultation Groups Tool section of this document below.) If you have created such a group, check the box for that group, then click the Submit Request For Informal Consultation button.

      Note: By default, the request will be sent to all members of the group; however, you can optionally deselect the check box next to a name so that person will not receive a request.

      Screen capture.
      Requesting an informal consultation

    • Formal Consultation: Consultation groups may have been created for the college pertaining to the proposed course. Those groups from whom coordination is required by the college are grayed out and cannot be unchecked. To initiate a formal consultation, check the box for any additional pertinent consultation group besides those already checked, then click the Submit Request For Formal Consultation button.

      Note: By default, the request will be sent to all members of the group; however, you can optionally deselect the check box next to a name so that person will not receive a request.

      Screen capture.
      Requesting a formal consultation

      Note: If the proposal is for an undergraduate course, each party included in the Formal Consultation will be given two weeks to respond. A group/individual consultant is assumed to concur if no response is received within that time. No time limit is imposed in the case of a graduate, law, or medical course.

    • The third type of review is the actual approval process. The Send To College Proposal Administrative Group button is only available once all parties included in the Formal Consultation have responded to the proposal. (The faculty submitter and any staff person to whom CSCS rights have been granted to initiate the proposal will receive an e-mail when this has been achieved.) Once you click the Send To College Proposal Administrative Group button, you will not be able to further edit the proposal.

      Screen capture.
      Click Send To College Proposal Administrative Group.

Notes: Once the approval process has started, you will not be able to edit the information in the proposal. The information will be protected until it has been noted that a change is necessary. If you would like to make a change or reset the status of the proposal, you may contact the Faculty Senate at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to help you.

Some e-mail programs may place the automated e-mail into a recipient's "Junk" folder. If your proposal has not been reviewed by a particular individual you may want to notify him/her yourself that a review is necessary.

Submit a Proposal to Drop a Course

To submit a proposal to drop a course, from My Profile:

  1. Select the Enter My Course Submission and Consultation System link.

    Screen capture.
    Select Enter My Course Submission & Consultation System.

  2. Select the Create New Proposal link in the toolbar.

    Screen capture.
    Select Create New Proposal.

  3. If not already filled in, enter the name and Access Account user ID of the principal faculty member proposing that the course be dropped and select the college/department.

    Note: The default values for these fields correspond with the person who is currently logged on. It is important to mention that this information should always be representative of a faculty member. A staff member may complete the online forms, but he/she must first be given permission to access the CSCS. To grant permission to a non-faculty member see the CSCS Rights Tool: Granting CSCS Access to Non-Faculty Users section of this document below.

    Note: To look up the user ID of the principal faculty member or the submitter, you can select the Search Penn State Directory link.

  4. The name and e-mail of the submitter correspond with the person who is currently logged on, by default. If incorrect, edit the information as necessary.
  5. Click the Next button.
  6. On the resulting screen, select Drop to indicate the type of proposal.

    Screen capture.
    Select Drop.

  7. Click the Next button.
  8. Select the Course Abbreviation, then the Course Number & Title of the course you are proposing to drop.
  9. Select the college/academic unit with curriculum responsibility for the course.

    Screen capture.
    Select the College/Academic Unit with Curriculum Responsibility.

    Note: This selection will determine the required signatories that will be listed, dictate what college level consultation groups will be listed, and determine which college proposal administrative group will have management control over the proposal.

  10. Click the Next button.
  11. If the course was offered in the past four years, a message will indicate where and when, and any cross-listed courses and their locations will be listed. Once you have reviewed this information, click the Continue button.
  12. Enter the name and Access Account user ID and select the college/department of each faculty consultant the proposal requires. (If none, the approval process will begin with a review by the head of the department/campus academic officer.)
  13. Click the Next button.
  14. Enter the name and Access Account user ID of all other necessary consultants/reviewers.

    Note: The number of consultants may differ according to the course level, e.g., undergraduate or graduate. However, there will at least be information sections for the head of the department/campus academic officer, the college representative, and the dean of the college. This information may already be filled in. If it is incorrect or missing, you may modify these fields to reflect the correct information.

  15. Click the Next button.
  16. On the course information screen, enter a Justification Statement as to why the course should be dropped and the Effective Date for dropping the course.

    Note: The Consultation Summary/Response text field can be used after the proposal has been submitted and reviewed in order for the submitter to respond to reviewers' comments.

  17. Click the Next button.

    Note: If for section B, number 9, you selected "I wish to add cross-listings," a screen will display where you must specify how many cross listings to add. Select a number, then click Next.

    Screen capture.
    If applicable, select the number of cross-listings.

    For each cross-listed course, specify the course abbreviation and course number, then click Continue.

    Screen capture.
    Specify the course abbreviation and number of each cross-listed course.

    On the subsequent screen, specify the head of department/campus academic officer/division head for each course. Click Next.

  18. You may now send the proposal out for review. There are three different types of review:
    • An informal consultation is a means by which a proposal can be reviewed by any number of people without affecting the status of the approval process. It can be used for friendly peer/informal review before or during the approval process. An e-mail will be sent to you (the initiator of the proposal) only if the reviewer does not concur with the proposal. (To learn how to create a group of informal consultants, see the Manage My Consultation Groups Tool section of this document below.) If you have created such a group, check the box for that group, then click the Submit Request For Informal Consultation button.

      Note: By default, the request will be sent to all members of the group; however, you can optionally deselect the check box next to a name so that person will not receive a request.

      Screen capture.
      Requesting an informal consultation

    • Formal Consultation: Consultation groups may have been created for the college pertaining to the proposed course. Those groups from whom coordination is required by the college are grayed out and cannot be unchecked. To initiate a formal consultation, check the box for any additional pertinent consultation group besides those already checked, then click the Submit Request For Formal Consultation button.

      Note: By default, the request will be sent to all members of the group; however, you can optionally deselect the check box next to a name so that person will not receive a request.

      Screen capture.
      Requesting a formal consultation

      Note: If the proposal is for an undergraduate course, each party included in the Formal Consultation will be given two weeks to respond. A group/individual consultant is assumed to concur if no response is received within that time. No time limit is imposed in the case of a graduate, law, or medical course.

    • The third type of review is the actual approval process. The Send To College Proposal Administrative Group button is only available once all parties included in the Formal Consultation have responded to the proposal. (The faculty submitter and any staff person to whom CSCS rights have been granted to initiate the proposal will receive an e-mail when this has been achieved.) Once you click the Send To College Proposal Administrative Group button, you will not be able to further edit the proposal.

      Screen capture.
      Click Send To College Proposal Administrative Group

Notes: Once the approval process has started, you will not be able to edit the information in the proposal. The information will be protected until it has been noted that a change is necessary. If you would like to make a change or reset the status of the proposal, you may contact the Faculty Senate at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to help you.

Some e-mail programs may place the automated e-mail into a recipient’s "Junk" folder. If your proposal has not been reviewed by a particular individual you may want to notify him/her yourself that a review is necessary.

Revise a Proposal at the Request of a Reviewer

Once a proposal has been submitted, a reviewer may indicate on the CSCS review screen that he or she will only concur with the proposal pending a specified revision. In that case, the initiator will receive an e-mail notification. The proposal will again be editable by the initiator to complete the revision.

Once the revision has been made, on the main CSCS screen listing all proposals created, the initiator should click the blue person icon next to the title of the proposal. The subsequent pages will check all of the business rules to ensure that the initiator has responded to all consultations and reviews that require a response. Once all actions have been completed, the initiator will be presented with a button to return the proposal to the required signatory that place the proposal on a pending status.

Note: If formal consultation has been requested during the pending status, all formal consultation must be completed before sending the proposal back to the required signatory that placed the proposal on a pending status.

Respond to a Formal Reviewer of a Course Proposal Who Does Not Concur

If an initiator has submitted a proposal for a course and a formal reviewer, required signatory, or reviewer assigned to a college administrative group does not concur, the initiator is required to respond to the reviewer’s comments.

Notifications that such an action is necessary appear in two locations. On the My Profile screen in the title bar of the CSCS component, a person icon will appear indicating that at least one of the proposals you have created requires your action. Within the CSCS tool on the default screen, a person icon will also appear next to the title of the proposal; hover your cursor over the icon for information on what action needs to be taken. To respond to a comment, click on the print view for the proposal. Within the print view in the consultation section, select the Respond to Comments link. You will reach a screen in which to enter your response to the reviewer's comments.

If you have not yet responded to the reviewer who does not concur, the system will send you a weekly reminder e-mail.

If the action required states that the proposal must be returned to the required signatory, to do so, click on the proposal and navigate to the Request Consultation screen. At the bottom of the screen, click the Return to Required Signatory button.

Understanding the CSCS Tools

The CSCS includes a set of tools that will allow a non-faculty member access to the CSCS, allow the proposal initiator to create any number of informal consultation groups, allow a designated college representative to create a college level consultation group, and allow a designated college representative to view, edit, and request reviews of any course proposal within the college. To access these tools from My Profile:

  1. Select the Enter My Course Submission & Consultation System link.

    Screen capture.
    Select Enter My Course Submission & Consultation System.

  2. Select the CSCS Tools link in the toolbar.

    Screen capture.
    Select CSCS Tools.

Five tools are available, CSCS Rights, Manage My Consultation Groups, College Level Consultation Groups, College Proposal Administrator Members, and College Proposal Administrative Tool. The first two tools are detailed below.

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CSCS Tools menu

CSCS Rights Tool: Granting CSCS Rights to Non-Faculty Users

By default, only faculty members have the right to access the CSCS. A faculty member can grant a staff member rights to the CSCS using the CSCS Rights tool in order to enter course proposal information. However, students are not allowed rights to the CSCS.

Note: Staff members with faculty rights (staff who are also instructors) can activate the CSCS themselves.

To grant a staff member rights to the CSCS:

  1. On the Tools screen, select the CSCS Rights link.

    Screen capture.
    Select CSCS Rights.

  2. Enter the Access Account user ID, last name, or first name of the individual to whom you would like to grant CSCS rights, then click the Search button.

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    Enter the user ID, last name, or first name, then click Search.

  3. In the list of search results below, select the Add link next to the individual to whom you wish to grant rights to the CSCS.

    Note: If the staff member for whom you are searching already has faculty rights, the search will return no results.

    Screen capture.
    Select the Add link next to the name.

Note: After you have granted CSCS rights to a user, he/she will need to follow the steps described above in the Activate the CSCS section of this document.

Manage My Consultation Groups Tool

The Manage My Consultation Groups tool is used for creating any number of groups or individuals that a proposal initiator may use to request an informal review.

To create an informal group:

  1. On the Tools screen, select the Manage My Consultation Groups link.

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    Select Manage My Consultation Groups.

  2. Click the Create New Group button.

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    Click the Create New Group button.

  3. Enter a name for the group in the text box provided.
  4. Select the Informal Consultation check box, the Formal Consultation check box, or both. This selection affects where the group will be listed as a choice when you have completed a course proposal and are ready to send it for review.
  5. Click the Save Group Settings button.
  6. In the Group Membership section, assign members to the group using either of two methods: individually or collectively using a specially formatted file.
    • To assign members to the group individually:

      Enter the Penn State Access Account user ID, e.g., xyz123, and name of an individual peer/informal consultant, then click the Add This Member button.

      Screen capture.
      Enter the user ID and name, then click Add This Member.

    • To assign multiple members to the group at once:
      1. Within a spreadsheet application such as Excel, enter the consultant names in one column and the Penn State Access Account user IDs in a second column, with no column headers.

        Screen capture.
        Example spreadsheet

      2. When saving the spreadsheet file, from the Save as type pull-down menu, select CSV (Comma delimited) (*.csv).

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        Save as CSV (Comma delimited) (*.csv).

      3. Within the lower portion of the ANGEL screen, under the Upload a *.CSV file subheading, click the Browse button.

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        Click Browse.

      4. Locate the .csv file on your local drive and double-click its name.
      5. Click the Upload button.

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        Click Upload.

      6. On the subsequent screen, if the list of consultants appears to be accurate, click the Yes, Continue The Upload button.

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        Click Yes, Continue The Upload.

      7. You may click the Cancel button at the bottom of the screen to return to the CSCS Tools menu or the Home button to leave the CSCS and return to My Profile.

The information entered on this page will be used to send an e-mail to request a review of a specific proposal. Once a group has been created you will be able to select the group you wish to review the proposal. You will be able to send out the request on the Review Proposal and Send Email page after you have entered all of the information for the proposal.

Screen capture.
Requesting a consultation

All members of groups you have created will also be added to your list of individual consultants.

To add an individual consultant not already a member of one of your groups:

  1. On the Tools screen, select the Manage My Consultation Groups link.

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    Select Manage My Consultation Groups.

  2. Beneath the Individuals subheading, click the Add New Individual button.

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    Click the Add New Individual button.

  3. Enter the Penn State Access Account user ID, e.g., xyz123, and name of the individual.
  4. Click the Save This Individual button.

    Screen capture.
    Click the Save This Individual button.

When you are ready to request an informal consultation, select the appropriate group, then click the Submit Request For Informal Consultation button. Note again that these reviews will only provide feedback and do not affect the approval process in any way.

View the Review History of a Proposal

If your proposal has been reviewed, you may access information about who has reviewed the proposal as well as their comments.

Note: All reviews are displayed in this location, including any reviews that may have occurred previous to a proposal’s being reset and resubmitted. Consultants who have not yet submitted a review are not listed in this location.

To view the review history:

  1. Select the Enter My Course Submission & Consultation System link.
  2. Under the title of the appropriate proposal, click the View Review History button.

Note: The View Review History button is only available if the proposal has been reviewed.

Alternatively, if you want to determine which consultants have completed their review, without viewing their comments:

  1. Select the Enter My Course Submission & Consultation System link.
  2. Select the title of the proposal.
  3. From the Navigation pull-down menu in the upper right, select the Request Consultation page, then click Go.
  4. Click the plus (+) icon next to the name of a consultation group to expand the view.

Date Complete will be indicated for each consultant who has completed a review.

 

Print a Copy of the Proposal

To print a copy of a proposal, from My Profile:

  1. Select the Enter My Course Submission & Consultation System link.
  2. Click the page icon to the left of the appropriate proposal title. A print-friendly version of the proposal will open in a new window.

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    Click the page icon to the left of the title.

    Note: If the initiator began creating a proposal but exited before saving the third proposal screen indicating the course designation, the print view icon will not appear.

  3. Print the proposal using your browser's print command.
  4. When finished, you may close the new window.

Notes: The print version of a proposal shows all current reviews. If the proposal was reviewed, reset, then resubmitted, reviews from the current approval process are displayed, but not reviews that occurred before the proposal was reset. Those earlier reviews can be viewed when you click View Review History, as described in the previous section.

As opposed to when you view the review history, described in the previous section, in print view, all consultants are listed, even if they have not yet submitted a review.

Review a Course Proposal

If you have received an e-mail that states that your review of a course proposal is requested, you are either being asked by the submitter to provide feedback as a peer/informal consultant, or you are a necessary consultant in the course proposal approval process. The following information will help you locate the proposal and submit a review of it.

The information for a course proposal is now located in the Course Submission & Consultation System (CSCS) in ANGEL. The information is very similar to the information that is required for a paper version; however, the CSCS was created to electronically manage course proposal data, as well as facilitate the approval process.

To locate a proposal you have been asked to review:

  1. Go to ANGEL at http://cms.psu.edu/ and log on using your Penn State Access Account user ID and password.
  2. On My Profile, under the My Course Submission & Consultation System subheading in the list of proposed courses "awaiting your review," click the page icon to the left of the proposal title. A print-friendly version of the proposal will open in a new window.
  3. Review the proposal.
  4. Under the My Course Submission & Consultation System subheading, select the title of the proposal. The title will be followed by the abbreviation of any special category for an undergraduate course.

    Screen capture.
    Select the title of the proposal.

  5. On the Submit Your Review screen, click the radio button indicating whether or not you concur.

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    Click the radio button indicating whether or not you concur.

    Note: If you are a required signatory, in addition to the choices of "Yes, I concur" or "No, I do not concur," a third option is available, labeled "Pending the following action by the initiator." This option should be selected when a relatively minor revision by the initiator is necessary, after which you will concur. The nature of the requested revisions should be entered in the Comments field. If you have selected this option, once you submit your review, the initiator will receive an e-mail notification. The proposal will again be editable by the initiator to complete the revision. When the initiator submits the changes, the proposal will be returned to you.

  6. Enter your Comments regarding the proposal (required if you do not concur).
  7. Your title, campus, and department should already be filled in. You can edit this information if it is incorrect.
  8. Click the Submit Review button.

If you concur with the course proposal, the CSCS will automatically send an e-mail to the initiator of the proposal to inform him/her of your review. An e-mail will also be sent to the next consultant for review. If, however, you do not concur with the proposal, an e-mail will be sent to the initiator of the proposal informing him/her that the proposal was not approved and offer a description of why. In the instance of a proposal that is not approved, the approval process will start over. At this point, the initiator of the proposal will be able to make any necessary changes and begin the approval process over. You may be asked to review the proposal again after the changes have been made. An e-mail will be sent to you indicating whether this is the first review of the proposal or whether changes have been made.

If you do not immediately review the proposal, approximately every two days you will be sent an e-mail reminder requesting that the proposal be reviewed.

Once you have reviewed the proposal, you will notice that the proposal title will still be listed on My Profile. It will remain until 1) the Faculty Senate archives or deletes the course proposal, or 2) you hide it from your view. To hide the proposal, select the Permanently Hide This Proposal link listed below the proposal title. This action will not delete the information from the system, but rather hide the proposal title from your view. If you do not see the Permanently Hide This Proposal link, then either the proposal does not require your attention at this time, or you have not completed a review of the proposal.

Note: If you have been asked to review the proposal as an essential/formal faculty consultant (i.e., a faculty consultant or a consultant in a college level group), and the course is undergraduate level, you must review the proposal within two weeks. If two weeks pass without your review, the proposal will be approved by default. The list of reviews in the print version of the proposal, as well as when View Review History is selected, will indicate that the proposal has been approved by default.

If you are a member of two or more peer/informal consultation groups and have received more than one e-mail requesting you to review the same proposal, you only need to submit one review. Likewise, if you are a member of two or more essential/formal consultation groups and have received more than one e-mail requesting a review of the same proposal, you only need to submit one review. In each of these cases, your review will be listed twice in the print view of the proposal; if View Review History is clicked, the review will only be listed once. If you receive requests to review the same proposal as both a peer/informal consultant and an essential/formal consultant, you must submit two reviews. If you receive requests to review the same proposal as a member of more than one college level consultation group, you must submit a separate review for each request (the listing for each request on your My Profile page will indicate the name of the consultation group).

Appendix A: Special Categories Additional Information

Each undergraduate special category you select when submitting a new proposal requires entering additional information based on the category. Depending on the selected categories, you may also be asked to complete the General Education Core Competencies section. Below is the information that is requested for each category. The categories are listed in the order in which they will, potentially, be presented in the CSCS.

Writing/Speaking (GWS) Courses

The following information contains the description of and necessary information for a Writing/Speaking (GWS) Course.

The objective is for students to communicate information clearly and set forth their beliefs persuasively, both orally and in writing. In particular, they must be sufficiently proficient in writing, such that their expository prose meets the expectations of educated readers in both form and style. Gaining communication skills in a natural language or languages other than English may be incorporated as part of the objectives of communications.
(Senate Agenda, 4-30-85.)

In the review of the course proposal the General Education subcommittee will examine whether the proposal meets the General Education course criteria stated above and in addition shows how the course will:

  1. teach students to organize materials in a logical and clear manner.
  2. teach students to write clearly.
  3. teach students to write proficiently with respect to form and style.
  4. teach students to express ideas orally in a logical and clear manner.
  5. provide constructive criticism of the efforts of students to meet the General Education objectives of the Writing/Speaking Area.
  6. assess the degree to which its stated Writing/Speaking General Education objectives are met.

You may enter the necessary information into the text area on the page. If you have any questions regarding the information that is required you may contact the Faculty Senate office at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to assist you.

Quantification (GQ) Courses

The following information contains the description of and necessary information for a Quantification (GQ) Course.

The objective is for students to work with numbers so as to measure space, time, mass, forces and probabilities; to reason quantitatively; and to apply basic mathematical processes to daily work and everyday living.
(Senate Agenda, 4-30-85)

In the review of the course proposal, the General Education subcommittee will examine whether the proposal meets the General Education course criteria stated above and in addition shows how the course will:

  1. teach students to reason quantitatively.
  2. teach students to measure probabilities.
  3. apply basic mathematical principles and processes to practical problems of day-to-day living.
  4. provide opportunities for students to formulate informed judgments based on quantitative reasoning.
  5. assess the degree to which its stated Quantification General Education objectives are met.

You may enter the necessary information into the text area on the page. If you have any questions regarding the information that is required you may contact the Faculty Senate office at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to assist you.

Health and Physical Activity (GHA) Courses

The following information contains the description of and necessary information for a Health and Physical Activity (GHA) Course.

Courses will focus on the theory and practice of life span wellness and fitness activities, and on the knowledge, attitudes, habits, and skills needed to live well. Courses are expected to promote an active and healthful lifestyle and are understood to include such diverse topics as diet, exercise, stress management, the wise use of leisure time, alcohol consumption and drug use, sexual health awareness, and safety education. Courses may be knowledge-focused or practice-focused or integrated in any manner. Theory-focused courses are understood to emphasize the transmission of knowledge about some aspect of healthful living. Practice-focused courses are understood to emphasize attitudes, habits, and skills needed to engage in healthful living. Traditional dance, exercise, and sport activity classes are understood to meet the practice-focused criterion if they will promote healthful living across the life span.

In the review of the course proposal the General Education subcommittee will examine whether the proposal meets the General Education course criteria stated above and in addition shows how the course will:

  1. teach students to achieve and maintain good health.
  2. promote an active and healthful lifestyle.
  3. transmit knowledge about some aspect of healthful living, when emphasizing theory.
  4. develop attitudes, habits, and skills needed to engage in healthful living and promote healthful living across the life span, when emphasis on practice (dance, exercise, and sport activity).

You may enter the necessary information into the text area on the page. If you have any questions regarding the information that is required you may contact the Faculty Senate office at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to assist you.

Natural Sciences (GN) Courses

The following information contains the description of and necessary information for a Natural Sciences (GN) Course.

The goal of the Natural Sciences is to reveal the order, diversity, and beauty of nature and in so doing enable students to develop a greater appreciation of the world around them. The objective of the Natural Sciences is to understand the nature of science through exposure to the broad divisions of science-physical science, biological science, earth science, and applied natural science. The students should know how to acquire scientific factual information, to use scientific methodology, and to develop an appreciation of the natural world.

All divisions of Natural Science employ inductive reasoning and establish theories and laws of nature based on observation, and deductive reasoning to draw conclusions based on these theories and laws. Such reasoning is applied to the study of both non-living and living matter. Students should gain an understanding of how scientists reason and how they draw conclusions.
(Senate Agenda 4-30-85)

In the review of the course proposal the General Education subcommittee will examine whether the proposal meets the General Education course criteria stated above and in addition shows how the course will:

  1. broadly survey the existing knowledge in the discipline.
  2. develop an understanding of the inductive reasoning process and develop a student’s ability to reason inductively.
  3. develop an understanding of the deductive reasoning process and develop a student’s ability to reason deductively.
  4. include, if appropriate, laboratory work.
  5. relate its field of study to other fields of the natural sciences.
  6. assess the degree to which its stated Natural Sciences General Education objectives are met.

You may enter the necessary information into the text area on the page. If you have any questions regarding the information that is required you may contact the Faculty Senate office at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to assist you.

Arts (GA) Courses

The following information contains the description of and necessary information for an Arts (GA) Course.

Students should understand and appreciate some of the more important creative works, traditions, literature and history of the arts and architecture. The student should recognize the comprehensive role of arts and architecture as an expression of the cultural values of a society and the need to preserve these expressions for the benefit of future generations.

Students should recognize aesthetic values as an integral part of society’s essential need and gain lifelong benefits through the acquisition and appreciation of arts-related skills. Students should be conversant with the terminology, techniques, attitudes, ideas and skills which comprise the arts areas so as to understand the approaches to human existence and distinguish among the arts.
(Senate Agenda, 4-30-85)

In the review of the course proposal the General Education subcommittee will examine whether the proposal meets the General Education course criteria stated above and in addition shows how the course will:

  1. develop an understanding of creative works of arts and architecture.
  2. develop an understanding of the historical developments in arts and architecture.
  3. provide an opportunity for students to comprehend the role of arts and architecture as an expression of the cultural values of society.
  4. help students become conversant with the terminology, techniques, and ideas that comprise the Arts Area.
  5. lead students to a recognition of aesthetic values.
  6. relate its field of study to other arts disciplines.
  7. assess the degree to which its stated Arts General Education objectives are met.

You may enter the necessary information into the text area on the page. If you have any questions regarding the information that is required you may contact the Faculty Senate office at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to assist you.

Humanities (GH) Courses

The following information contains the description of and necessary information for a Humanities (GH) Course.

The objective of humanistic studies is to direct students toward interpretation and evaluation for the sake of a more significant form of participation in reality, rather than in the direction of methodologies for the technical manipulation of natural and cultural phenomena. Humanistic studies are divided into four categories: (1) literature, (2) history and culture, (3) advanced language, and (4) philosophy.

The study of the Humanities should develop competency in interpretive understanding of the human condition and of the values inherent in it. This interpretive understanding should evolve into the development of insights and a critical evaluation of the meaning of life, in its everyday details as well as in its historical and universal dimensions. Through this development students should acquire knowledge of and concern for the humanistic values which motivate and inform all humanistic studies.

In literature, students should achieve these objectives through the study of works in which the human condition is presented and evaluated through aesthetic means. In the study of Western and non-Western culture and history, the student should gain access to various human traditions and their changes through the course of time. In studies of the development, structure, and use of language, students will probe the foundations of communication and thought and become aware of the scope and limitations of human communication. In philosophical studies, students will encounter philosophical and religious concepts and traditions which attempt to bring ultimate sense to human existence.
(Senate Agenda, 4-30-85)

In the review of the course proposal the General Education subcommittee will examine whether the proposal meets the General Education course criteria stated above and in addition shows how the course will:

  1. develop broad, coherent overviews of major cultural or ideological currents throughout history.
  2. develop emphases on important figures, ideas, and events which influence the values of different societies.
  3. develop competence in interpretive understanding of the human condition and of the values inherent in it.
  4. lead the student to an appreciation of aesthetic values.
  5. teach the student techniques for the objective evaluation of readings and the formulation of clear and valid responses.
  6. assess the degree to which its stated Humanities General Education objectives are met.

You may enter the necessary information into the text area on the page. If you have any questions regarding the information that is required you may contact the Faculty Senate office at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to assist you.

Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS) Courses

The following information contains the description of and necessary information for a Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS) Course.

The objective of the Social and Behavioral Sciences is an understanding of the diverse personal, interpersonal, and societal forces which shape people’s lives and to approach these subjects through concepts, principles, and methods of scientific inquiry. The general goal is a theoretical understanding of the interrelationships of the determinants of the organization of human behavior. Students should be introduced to the scientific analysis of: (1) the forms, practices, and theories of politics; (2) the nature and operation of economic analysis; (3) the interrelationships of social institutions; (4) the dynamics of individual and group behavior and change; and (5) the processes and functions of human communication. Through the application of the methodologies of the Social and Behavioral Sciences, students should develop an understanding of the multiple nature of causality in social settings. The Social and Behavioral Sciences require a comprehensive, integrative, empirical and theoretical view of the social world.
(Senate Agenda, 4-30-85)

In the review of the course proposal the General Education subcommittee will examine whether the proposal meets the General Education course criteria stated above and in addition shows how the course will:

  1. broadly survey the existing knowledge in the discipline.
  2. develop the student’s understanding of the scientific methodologies of social and behavioral sciences.
  3. develop an understanding of the multiple nature of causality in social settings.
  4. relate its specific field of study, where appropriate, to other areas in the social and behavioral sciences.
  5. lead the student to an integration of the empirical knowledge and theoretical views of the social world.
  6. assess the degree to which its stated Social and Behavioral Sciences General Education objectives are met.

You may enter the necessary information into the text area on the page. If you have any questions regarding the information that is required you may contact the Faculty Senate office at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to assist you.

General Education Core Competencies (GHA, GN, GA, GH, or GS course suffixes)

No one course must achieve every General Education objective, but each proposal must specify clearly which objectives it proposes to meet. The Senate legislation requires that typically three or more core competencies, activities, and strategies for enhanced learning be integrated in the courses offered in the areas of Health and Physical Activity, Natural Sciences, Arts, Humanities, and Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Knowledge domain courses must require each student to engage in activities promoting learning course content through practicing, typically, three or more of the following core competencies, activities, and strategies for enhanced learning.

Indicate how the course will engage students in the following (non-applicable items should be left blank):

  1. writing, speaking and/or other forms of self-expression
  2. information gathering, such as the use of the library, computer/electronic resources, and experimentation or observation
  3. synthesis and analysis in problem solving and critical thinking, including, where appropriate, the application of reasoning and interpretive methods, and quantitative thinking
  4. collaborative learning and teamwork
  5. activities that promote and advance intercultural and/or international understanding
  6. activities that promote the understanding of issues pertaining to social behavior, scholarly conduct, and community responsibility
  7. a significant alternative competency for active learning designed for and appropriate to a specific course

You may enter the necessary information into the text areas on the page. If you have any questions regarding the information that is required you may contact the Faculty Senate office at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to assist you.

Writing Across the Curriculum (W, M, X, Y course suffixes)

  1. A copy of the course syllabus, which should include a statement of course objectives, a definition of writing-intensive teaching that helps students see how this "W" course is different from other courses that assign writing, a sequence of class activities, references to writing assignments, and weight of writing assignments in relation to the final course grade.
  2. A concise explanation of how the proposed course will fulfill each of the following criteria:
    1. Writing Assignment Design
      Both informal and formal writing assignments should relate clearly to the course objectives and should serve as effective instruments for learning the subject matter of the course. Instructors should communicate to students the requirements of formal, graded writing assignments in writing, not just orally. In writing-intensive courses, writing assignments are characteristically designed to help students investigate the course subject matter, gain experience in interpreting data or the results of research, shape writing to a particular audience, or practice the type of writing associated with a given profession or discipline. Much of the writing may be informal and ungraded, yet meaningful, so students are encouraged to think and discover through a process in which mistakes are a natural part of learning. Examples of such writing include one-minute papers at the beginning, middle, or end of class; reactions to lectures, labs, and readings; journals, logs, and notebooks of observations, readings, and other experimental activities; letters to classmates; weekly digests; e-mail dialogues; records of peer group discussions; and stories of one’s thinking on a problem.
    2. Treatment of Writing as a Developmental Process
      Students will be afforded opportunities to practice writing throughout the semester, with emphasis given to writing as a process that develops through several iterations. Typically, writing-intensive courses require multiple writing assignments, a sequence of preparatory writings (outline, formulation of thesis, first draft) leading to a final product, or informational writing assignments (e.g., regular journal entries, field notes, short in-class papers, revision of first draft) that aid students in developing other written documents. Experimentation with assignments is encouraged.>
    3. Written Feedback from the Instructor
      Opportunities for students to receive written feedback from the instructor and to apply the instructor’s feedback to their future writing will be built into the course. The instructor will clearly identify and explain the type of writing required in the course and will provide guidance as needed. A writing-intensive course may also include peer review of written work, tutorial assistance, instructor conferences, group writing projects, the use of writing or learning centers, teaching assistant feedback, and classroom discussions of assigned readings about writing. The use of diverse feedback mechanisms is encouraged, but none of these mechanisms should substitute for the instructor as the principal source of written feedback to the student.
    4. Evaluation of Writing
      Writing will be evaluated by the instructor, and writing quality will be a factor in determining each student’s final grade. Before students begin writing, instructors will communicate to students the criteria by which their writing will be evaluated. Sound criteria for assessing writing quality include, but are not limited to, the writer’s ability to direct the material to an intended audience, the employment of organizational strategies, the development of both content and reasoning, adherence to conventions of a particular discipline, accuracy of the information presented, citation and integration of sources, grammar, diction, and syntax, and spelling. Writing assignments should be worth at least 25 percent of each student's final grade.
  3. One or two examples of the actual writing assignment sheets the instructor plans to use in the course.

You may enter the necessary information into the text areas on the page. If you have any questions regarding the information that is required you may contact the Faculty Senate office at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to assist you.

United States Cultures (US) and International Cultures (IL) Courses

United States Cultures (3 credits)

A wide variety of social, cultural, and political forces have shaped the culture and institutions of the United States. As a result, it is important for university students to be exposed to the historical background, development, and current configurations of various groups in our pluralistic American culture. Such exposure will promote an understanding of the many complex issues of inter-group relations and the many kinds of cultural contributions that have shaped our nation.

A course that fulfills the United States Cultures requirement must strive to increase students’ understanding of contemporary United States society. Such a course need not focus exclusively on the present and may concern a historical subject.

Courses within the United States Cultures designation will include two or more of the following components and will include those components in the graded evaluation of student performance.

United States Cultures courses will:

  1. Cultivate student knowledge of issues of social identity such as ethnicity, race, class, religion, gender, physical/mental disability, age, or sexual orientation;
  2. Convey to students a knowledge of different United States values, traditions, beliefs, and customs;
  3. Increase student knowledge of the range of United States cultural achievements and human conditions through time;
  4. Increase student knowledge of United States social identities not in isolation, but in relation to one another (for example, the interaction of race or gender with socioeconomic status)>

International Cultures

A wide variety of social, cultural, and political forces have shaped the cultures, nations, and institutions of the modern world. As a result, it is important for university students to be exposed to the historical backgrounds, cultural and scientific contributions, and economic, social, psychological, and political circumstances of civilizations, cultures, and nations outside of the United States, to promote understanding of the variety of world cultures.

A course that fulfills the International Cultures requirement must strive to increase student knowledge of the variety of international societies and may deal to some extent with U.S. culture in its international connections. It need not focus exclusively on the present and may, indeed, be a historical subject. Courses with the International Cultures designation will do two or more of the following:

  1. Cultivate student knowledge of the similarities and differences among international cultures;
  2. Convey to students a knowledge of other nations’ cultural values, traditions, beliefs, and customs;
  3. Increase students’ knowledge of the range of international cultural achievements and human conditions through time;
  4. Increase students’ knowledge of nations and cultures not in isolation, but in relation to one another.

The following principles will be adopted to make the approval criteria clear, the approval process as quick as possible, and the course designations readily understandable to both students and advisors. The following criteria will be used in determining course designations:

  1. The course is designed to fulfill the required objectives, as indicated in the previous descriptions.
  2. At least one-quarter of the course is oriented toward fulfilling the objectives of the requested designation as United States Cultures, International Cultures, or United States and International Cultures. For a course seeking both designations, each 25 percent must be satisfied for a total of at least 50 percent.
  3. The objectives are included in the graded evaluation of student performance.
  4. Every undergraduate course meeting these requirements will be eligible for the appropriate designation(s), regardless of course level, offering unit, or other University designations.

Each course proposal must include the following information:

Course proposals must follow the appropriate course proposal form format for new or changed courses. A US and/or IL course proposal must be consistent with the objectives of the United States Cultures and/or International Cultures requirements. Specifically, each proposal must:

  1. State whether the course meets the definition of 1) a United States cultures course, 2) an international cultures course, or 3) both a United States cultures and international cultures course.
  2. Include a complete course outline including a statement of course objectives that reflect the US and/or IL content, and a listing of major topics with an approximate length of time for their discussion.
  3. Include pertinent information on the US/IL aspects of the course in the long course description.
  4. Describe how the course encourages students to develop understanding of the historical backgrounds, cultural and scientific contributions, economic, social, psychological, and political circumstances of the group being studied. While no one course or section is expected to achieve every criterion, each course proposal must clearly specify which criteria it proposes to meet. Thus the proposal should explain how students, within the context of the course, will be encouraged to do or achieve three or more of the following:
    1. see nations, cultures, and/or social identities not in isolation, but in relation to each other;
    2. cultivate awareness of the pluralism and diversity within the United States and international cultures;
    3. increase knowledge of different cultural values, traditions, beliefs and customs;
    4. appreciate the diversity that exists among persons who share a particular social identity;
    5. increase knowledge about the range of cultural achievements and human conditions through time;
    6. recognize and be sensitive to the different ways social identities have been valued;
    7. reexamine beliefs and behaviors about social identities (ethnicity, race, class, religion, gender, physical/mental disability, or sexual orientation);
    8. increase understanding of the nature of stereotypes and biases of other cultures and other nations;
    9. interact successfully with representatives of other nations and with persons of different social groups;
    10. increase ability to locate and evaluate information and gain knowledge about other peoples of the world.
  5. Include a statement that explains how the achievement of the US/IL educational student objectives will be assessed (e.g., grading procedures).

You may enter the necessary information into the text areas on the page. If you have any questions regarding the information that is required you may contact the Faculty Senate office at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to assist you.

Bachelor of Arts Courses

Bachelor of Arts degree majors require 9-24 credits distributed among three categories:

Foreign Language (0-12 credits): Must attain 12th credit level of proficiency in one language. This proficiency must be demonstrated by either examination or course work.

The B.A. Fields (9 credits): Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Arts, Foreign Languages, Natural Sciences, Quantification. Courses may not be taken in the area of the student’s primary major. Foreign language credits in this category must be in a second foreign language or beyond the 12th credit level of proficiency in the first language. Credits must be selected from the list of approved courses at http://www.psu.edu/bulletins/bluebook/gened/bad.html.

Other Cultures (0-3 credits): Students must select 3 credits from the list of approved Other Cultures courses at http://www.psu.edu/bulletins/bluebook/gened/bad.html. Students may count courses in this category in order to meet other major, minor, elective, or General Education requirements, except for the General Education US/IL requirement.

Each course proposal must include the pertinent information referenced below for the category listed above:

Courses proposed for designation in the six central fields (9 credits) must:

  1. follow general course proposal guidelines to include documentation of support from all colleges in which the course is to be taught in the preparation of the proposal.
  2. meet the criteria for designation as a GA, GH, GS, GN or GQ course (without the active learning components) or, if the course is for foreign language designation, involve a significant amount of speaking, reading, and/or writing in that language (i.e., not courses taught in the English language that focus on culture, literature, civilization, etc.).
  3. include pertinent information on the B.A. aspects of the course in the long course description. (see item b.3. under Course Add in the Guide to Curricular Procedures).

Courses proposed for Other Cultures designation

In addition to items 1 and 3 above, courses seeking the Other Cultures designation should document how the course will address the criteria for this requirement.

The Other Cultures requirement denotes courses devoted to a culture or cultures differing significantly from the North American-European tradition. This requirement ensures that students have some familiarity with one or more of these cultures, which constitute a large majority of the earth's population.

Examples would include courses focused on Asia, Africa, Latin America, and/or indigenous cultures.

As a set of basic criteria, courses appropriate to the requirement should:

  1. be limited to content that is fundamentally "non-Western" and devoted to a culture or cultures differing significantly from the North American-European tradition. (For example, a course on "The Origins of African Drama" would be viewed as applicable, while a course on "The Origins of English Drama" would not.)
  2. be predominantly centered on "non-Western" concerns in regards to course content and overall focus. Courses can include a small amount of Western material the purposes of comparison, but courses that have only partial content in non-Western areas are not applicable. (For example, a course in "Asian Art" would be viewed as appropriate while a course in "World Art" that had only a portion of its content devoted to non-Western art would not.) For guidance, a requirement of at least 85 percent non-Western content is expected.
  3. be specifically concerned with aspects of non-Western culture rather than holding a primary interest in Western responses or reactions to non-Western cultures. This does not mean that Western influences, reactions, responses, or perceptions should not play a role in course content but, rather, they should not be the principal focus or concern of the course.

You may enter the necessary information into the text areas on the page. If you have any questions regarding the information that is required you may contact the Faculty Senate office at 814-863-1202 and a CSCS administrator will be able to assist you.

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